Aiton English

Learning Languages for Life

Tag: cae

10 Step Exam speaking: Likes and favorite

Step 1: Listening practice

Listen once, twice or three times to the audio below to get the ideas

 

Step 2: Learn from listening

Listen again, pausing an repeating where necessary to make a note of useful expressions.

 

Step 3: Focus on opinion and reason structures (coherence and cohesion )

Looking at the table below, listen again and mark which opinion / reason structures are used.

 

Step 4: Improve your pronunciation

Listen again to the opinion and reason structures, make a note of stress and intonation.

 

Step 5: Moving from passive to active

Listen on repeat for a period of time. As you listen…

a – repeat the opinion structures you hear from the table, copying the stress and intonation

b – when you feel comfortage (still with the audio on repeat), repeat the structures and “finish”

 

Step 6: Plan your own answer

For the first question (and later the other questions), make a note of your opinion / reason (example, contrast)

 

Step 7: Linguistic choice

Choose the opinion structure that best matches your opinion

 

Step 8: Fluency = 100%, Pronunciation = 100%

Without fully answering the question, practice again and again the opinion structure until you feel that your “active use” of the structure is 100% fluent with 100% suitable intonation / stress.

 

Step 9: Fully active answer

Record yourself answering the question.

 

Step 10: Review and repeat

Listen to your answer, if you feel it needs to be done again, do it again. (Note, although practice makes perfect, it is a good idea to not repeat it too many times. As you move through the different questions you will get better.)

 

 

 

Food and Diet:

Fast food England: does putting a cap on takeaways improve people’s health?

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/40eae015e5119a5c1e23dd10d51defcabb8d6338/0_224_5542_3326/master/5542.jpg?w=620&q=20&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&dpr=2&s=3e8cd75343ede9b01f1165b5c28806f1

Roziur Choudhury prides himself on offering a healthier alternative at Grillzone, in the east London suburb of Dagenham. Photograph: Teri Pengilley for the Guardian (link below)

 

 

 

Pre-reading: activate ideas

  1. Do you think people in your country eat too much fast food?
  2. What do you think the government should do about fast food
  • ban fastfood outlets (shops)
  • introduce a cap (maximum number) on fastfood outlets
  • introduce a levy (special tax) on fastfood outlets
  • let the market decide

Pre-reading: linguistic choice

What is your linguistic choice for the gapped combinations below?

e.g.

It is too early to say whether Roziur Choudhury is the future of Britain’s  (1) _______________ fast food sector. For now, he represents its conscience.

(1) flourishing, booming, burgeoning / struggling, waning / lucractive /  vital / insignificant …….     fast food sector

 

It is too early to say whether Roziur Choudhury is the future of Britain’s  (1) _______________ fast food sector. For now, he represents its conscience.

Choudhury’s smart new Grillzone restaurant, in the east London suburb of Dagenham, aims to be a “healthy” takeaway: golden, corn-fed half-chickens roast _(2)____________ on a rotary grill; chips are fried in low-fat oil; (3) ________ chopped salad is given away free with orders.

 

“Why would I want to feed people something I would not feed my own family?” Choudhury asks.

At £3.49 for six chicken wings, however, his food is (3)____________  pricey – and the competition around here is (4)__________. There are 61 fast-food joints jostling for business within a mile radius of Grillzone, according to the Centre for Diet and Activity Research’s new “food environment assessment tool”, which offers the public unprecedented analysis of the prevalence of food outlets throughout England.

 

click here to compare your linguistic choice with the author’s

 

Food and diet listening and vocab for speaking

                                                  ⤾

© 2017 Aiton English

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑